Minimally Invasive Bunion Surgery: The Procedure You Should Take

for Bunion Pain


lam modified bunionectomy

 

About 30% of individuals with ages 16 years and above suffer from bunions, and half of these individuals are women.


 Bunions can be asymptomatic at first, but as the bunion starts to get larger, this condition can get really painful and can be debilitating.



Bunions develop when the big toe deviates towards the second toe and joint between the big toe and the first metatarsal bone protrudes outwards.

 

A lot of people believe that a bunion is an overgrowth of bone, some patients develop this but it is rare. A bunion actually is a dislocation of the big toe joint, causing the joint to protrude outwards causing irritation, redness or calluses.

Treatment of bunions always starts as a conservative approach. Use of proper foot wear (wider shoes), custom orthotics, physical therapy and foot exercises/ foot stretching are common modalities.  Not all bunions need surgery, but conservative treatment may not totally eliminate bunion pain.

Bunion surgery is the only way to truly get rid of bunion pain because the procedure re-aligns the bone, joint and the big toe, eliminating the huge bump that causes the pain. Some patients stay away from bunion surgery due to fear of a long and very painful recovery. This is actually true only for the old method of bunion removal, which involves a very large incision and removing some portions of bone to reduce the bump.

A new surgical technique called minimally invasive bunion surgery or no scar bunion surgery involves very minimal pain and swelling after surgery, making recovery time very short and virtually pain free – some patients are able to walk the following day after surgery! The procedure involves a very small incision, then the metatarsal bone is cut, the big toe is aligned, the bones are pinned for immobilization and that’s basically it. The procedure is an out-patient basis, which means you can go home the same day.

For more information on no scar bunion surgery, visit scarlessbunion.com or call (239) 430-3668 (FOOT)


 Call (239) 430-3668 (FOOT)

for more information on scarless bunion surgery

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